200 snakes have stabbed him in his quest for a cure


GETTY IMAGES
Every minute, the snake bites one person, and four others suffer permanent disability across the globe.

Yet there are some people who risk their lives for research on snakes.
Tim Friede, a native of Wisconsin, USA, takes a video of the deadly snake attacking it, posting it on his YouTube channel.


Tim Friede reveals to his viewers on YouTube how he feels when snakes bite him
In one of the videos, after a snake cuts Friede twice in the palm of his hand, Friede continues to watch the camera speak, without worrying about the blood leaking from the snake.

"The arrival of such a snake is coming soon. The odor of a snake like 1,000 bees kills one at a time.

Beef has one or two milligrams of poison. But the odor of this snake is 300 to 500 milligrams. "

Then, he told the BBC what was to come.

"There I got a swelling after the snake bite. It kept me going for a few days. From the size of the swelling, I could predict the amount of poison the snake had in my area. It was very hot. , 'he speaks with conviction.

Danger n and lack of fitness?

But not everyone is impressed with what Friede is doing on YouTube.

GETTY IMAGES
Tim Friede says his body is protected from snake bites

"We do not know what these people are doing. It is dangerous and inappropriate. We are not working on them," said Dr. Stuart Ainsworth of the Center for Disease Control and Prevention them through Liverpool.
The center is one of the leading research institutes for the prevention of a single snake vaccine.
Newer vaccines, rats and other animals used in laboratories are being tested. If the risk of pre-eclampsia has been confirmed then try to apply it to the human body in a sterile environment.
"People give themselves immunity, due to the lack of hyperactivity. And doing so can cause death. People should avoid doing that," said Dr. Ainsworth.

However, there is a shortage of research protocols for the treatment of snake bites in pharmaceuticals around the world.
"There are no standard treatment plans for drugs or safety or the efficacy of drugs," says the UK's Wellcome Trust, one of the leading research institutes of science.

Bad storm
Friede has repeatedly denied allegations that he was risking his life in search of fans on social media.
"I'm not doing YouTube videos - I just want to save lives and make a difference. I'm only using YouTube to find the doctors we are currently working with," he said.

GETTY IMAGES

Tim Friede has jumped the well on various occasions

Of the 3,000 species of snakes, only 200 species have deadly poisonings that can kill or harm humans. And Friede knows many of these species very well.
Catching up with fun, humor and more, Friede has endured over 200 snakes in the last 20 years. In addition to a batch of some 700 snakes, he had injected with himself.
The amount of poison a snake can cause when they chop may vary. Sometimes the snake bites without leaving a poison inside. Vaccination is another way to control the amount of poisoning.

"If you do not have enough protection from the venom of a snake it can affect the body's immune system.
This means that the air passage through the air will freeze you so you can't breathe, your eyes will be closed and you won't be able to talk, and so until your body part is affected. But it also doesn’t affect your brain, so you keep thinking until you die, ”Friede said.

Your wishes are very long
The refrigerators keep a collection of poisonous snakes that try their best in the backyard.

Image copyright
One of the most dangerous snakes - its predator can kill within 30 minutes
I appreciate you from Africa. My style is intense and frightening. "

The venom of the snake has poisonous nerve damage.

"The rest of the genus has the potential to cause a disorder in the human genome, just as someone might cut off a finger or an arm."
Friede works with the idea that if a person is bitten by a snake, it can increase his or her body esteem. But experts criticize this understanding.

Providing protection?
Such an approach - but using animals - has helped to make the current snakebite vaccine effective.

Since the 19th century, the method of treating poisonous snakes has not changed much.

The horse or sheep are injected with a small amount of venom. Then take a chemical that gives the body protection from the blood of the animal for testing.
"These animals want to kill me, but I don't want to die. So I have to be the horse. Why not protect ourselves? That's the question Friede asked.
The 51-year-old former truck driver, Friede is not a cardiologist and did not attend university. His fear of being bitten by snakes was the reason he embarked on this marvelous project 20 years ago.
He started using spiders and scorpions and then started using large snakes.

"I do not use any species of poisonous snakes on the ground. I choose to kill fast."

His body was filled with the scent of the snakes he had tried, which were about to expire in his experiments. And yet he enjoys snakes to chop him down without medical attention.

"Twelve times I had to jump out of a snake bite. Twice I was hospitalized as a result of the first year of testing. One had to learn. No university doctor could teach. man this. "

Fold the prevention
His experimentation gave him the confidence that his method was successful.


The poison of poisonous snakes is expensive and can cause blood clots
"The antibodies in my body are twice as high as the ones that protect against the venom of snakes. Scientific experiments have proven that" he said.
Two years ago, photos of Tim Friede on YouTube attracted the attention of a bodybuilding chemist, Jacob Glanville, who left his job at Pfizer's senior pharmaceutical company to set up his own production company. antidote to snake bites.
"What Tim has done is commendable, but it's risky. I would never recommend it to anyone else," Glanville said.

The company is currently taking Friede blood samples to the laboratory to develop new anti-snake drugs.

"They took the genetic material of DNA and RNA and the proteomics that it emitted. This is the peak of science," Friede said.

A neglected disease
The World Health Organization (WHO) says that 5.4 million people are bitten by snakes each year. 81,000 to 138 people die from poisoned snakes. Some 400,000 have permanent and life-threatening disabilities.


In many parts of the world, humans and snakes live in single living quarters, indicating a potential for conflict between them.
But then in 2017, the World Health Organization declared a snake bite in a series of neglected tropical diseases.

September 19 is set aside every year as a day for raising awareness of snakes. The goal is to tackle the problem that is plaguing rural communities in Asia, Africa and South America who still lack adequate health care systems.

In many countries, snake bites do not work, either because they have been in storage for a long time or because they work against the predators of certain snakes.

Rice
In May of this year, the Wellcome Trust announced the establishment of a $ 100 million foundation for new and improved drugs for snake bites.


The new drug has been tested to prove their risk for survival
Some agencies and institutions are also trying to provide safe and cheap medicine.
Friede's dealings with Glanville would have allowed Friede to make a lot of money if they could provide a new vaccine.
"You will not be paid to be bitten by a snake. But when we combine prevention there will be money. I have a lawyer and we have signed an agreement," Friede said.

Glanville is set to begin future tests.

"This study has been around for a long time - we are about to start tests with rats."

Persecution and mission
Glanville and Friede have been criticized by scientists for their use of methods that are contrary to science. The two men, however, managed to save their research.


Tim Friede says he takes risks to achieve a goal
"We have observed ethical issues in mind. We have followed the same procedures used in analyzing risks associated with work-related illnesses such as HIV and other illnesses.
Proving that his approach is difficult for some, Tim Friede added that there may be little left to be achieved.
"There is a purpose in my persecution. I have put my life in danger to find a single, easy-to-treat snake bite."

Post a Comment

0 Comments